Welcome back to the 365 Project with Picaboo! Don’t forget to RSVP so we can message you about prizes, special announcements, and discounts on Picaboo products. For all the information you need on The 365 project, please review this post.

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Week 5 Challenge: 6 Tips for Capturing a Sunrise

Week 5 Theme: Morning

6 Tips for Capturing a Sunrise

If you have kids like mine, you are up way before the sun even thinks about waking up. Sure, you may be tired and the dark makes you want to crawl back into bed, but use this early morning opportunity to try something new. Grab your camera, your coat, and head out to watch the sun rise. There are a few things to keep in mind while trying to catch that gorgeous sunrise.

Sunrise | Stephanie Glover Photography

1. Plan ahead: You can check the time for your local sunrise by visiting the Sunrise/Sunset calculator. Make sure you’re ready to capture the sunrise at least 20 minutes before hand so you can get set up. Winter is the best time to take a sunrise picture because you don’t have to get up way, way too early to capture it. Sunrise is normally around 6 am in the winter time. Weather can also affect your picture so make sure you check the weather report.

2. Grab a tripod {or use a ledge}: You may need to use a longer shutter speed to get your shot. A tripod will help with camera shake. If you don’t have a tripod, find a ledge or another sturdy surface. You can even make yourself a tripod. Keep your arms tucked in, close to your body. If you are standing, make sure your feet are at least shoulder-width apart and shoot sideways. This creates a wider base. If you are working at a lower angle, kneel. Keep one knee on the ground and put your elbow on the other knee {make sure to keep it straight!}. This arm will be the support for your camera.

3. Watch Your White Balance: This is a great time to take last week’s lesson on white balance into consideration. Make sure you are not shooting in Auto White Balance. You may miss a lot of the colors that are in a sunrise. Instead, try shooting with a “Cloudy” white balance. As I told you last week, this is the white balance setting that I use 95% of the time when shooting outdoors. By using the “Cloudy” setting, you will capture more warm tones and really capture a good representation of the sunrise colors.

4. Look around: You don’t always have to just shoot the sunrise. There is some amazing lighting during a sunrise. Look around and see how the light reflects off of a building or, if your lucky, the ocean. If you are shooting in a more natural setting, look in the trees and see how the leaves filter the light.

5. Keep Shooting: This is always one of my tips. Shoot, shoot, shoot, shoot. Change up your angles and play around with your composition.  The sun and lighting is always changing during a sunrise so make sure you capture it all. When you go back through your pictures when you get home, you will have a ton of options to choose from.

6. Enjoy Yourself: When I consciously make the effort to take a sunrise picture, I like to go alone. I grab a cup of coffee and head out. There’s something relaxing about the quiet and beauty that you experience when watching a sunrise.

Sunrise | Stephanie Glover Photography

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The Challenge: Plan ahead and go capture the sunrise! Or get creative and incorporate the morning into your pictures. What does morning mean to you? What time do you get up? Mornings begin and end at different times and different places. Share your photos and document a year in the life of your morning.

Sunrise | Stephanie Glover Photography

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Don’t forget to show off your sunrise pictures on the Picaboo Facebook Page!